• WHITE BOY RICK

    NOW PLAYING AT THE HI-POINTE THEATRE

  • BLACKkKLANSMAN

    NOW PLAYING AT THE HI-POINTE BACKLOT!

  • ASSASSINATION NATION

    COMING SEPTEMBER 21ST

    Advance Screening Thursday, September 20th at 8:00!

  • A STAR IS BORN

    COMING OCTOBER 5TH!

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    some studio restrictions may apply

  • THE HI-POINTE BACKLOT

    Opened May 2015

    Located in the Building Behind the Hi-Pointe Theatre

    Box Office Entrance at 1002 Hi-Pointe Place

  • 2018 STL Go! Winner - Best Movie Theatre Popcorn

  • Favorite Movie Theatre

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NOW PLAYING AT THE HI-POINTE THEATRE

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WHITE BOY RICK

Rated R/ 110 Minutes
Directed by: Yann Demange
Cast: Matthew McConaughey, Richie Merritt, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Showtimes

  • Wednesday, September 19:  (5:30), 8:00
  • Thursday, September 20: (5:30)
  • Below Shown at the Hi-Pointe Backlot
  • Thursday, September 20:  7:00
  • Friday, September 21-Sunday, September 23:  (4:30), 7:00
  • Monday, September 24-Thursday, September 27:  7:00

Set in 1980s Detroit at the height of the crack epidemic and the War on Drugs, WHITE BOY RICK is based on the moving true story of a blue-collar father and his teenage son, Rick Wershe, who became an undercover police informant and later a drug dealer, before he was abandoned by his handlers and...Read more

White Boy Rick weaves a dark, tragic tale of misspent youth

★★★ 1/2

Bruce Demara /Toronto Star

In White Boy Rick, director Yann Demange does a fine job recreating the spirit of the times — the big cars, VCRs, etc. — and creating a powerful sense of place in Detroit, a fading metropolis of rundown housing and mean streets. Aptly, it always seems to be snowing or raining. It’s based on a true story, and there’s clearly an agenda in the subtext as federal and local police forces come down hard, using whatever means (or pawns) that come to hand.

Matthew McConaughey is flat-out brilliant as Rick Sr., a failure as a father and provider who nonetheless has dreams of the big score and inculcates those ideas into his son, telling him they are “lions” in a world of lambs. Once again, the consequences are dire. McConaughey captures this flawed, larger than life character with dexterity. But it is Richie Merritt as young Rick who is a genuine revelation here, capturing the essence of his character — indolent but loyal and loving — with a performance that is subtle, textured and wholly believable. There’s some supporting work, including Bel Powley as older sister Dawn, whose struggle to return to the human fold is heart-rending, and Jennifer Jason Leigh as a canny federal agent buffeted by forces way above her pay grade. Eddie Marsan is a delight in the smallish role of Art Derrick, a well-connected drug kingpin living life large. The outcome for young Rick is as tragic as it is inevitable. 

White Boy Rick is the best kind of cautionary tale, rooted in painful truths and rendered by the filmmaker with care and authenticity.

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NOW PLAYING AT THE HI-POINTE BACKLOT

Ends Wednesday!

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BLACKkKLANSMAN

Rated R/ 135 Minutes
Directed by: Spike Lee
Cast: John David Washington, Adam Driver

Showtimes

  • Wednesday, September 19:  7:00

From visionary filmmaker Spike Lee comes the incredible true story of an American hero. It's the early 1970s, and Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) is the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth...Read more

‘BlacKkKlansman’ a masterful reality check from Spike Lee

★★★★

Richard Roeper / Chicago Sun-Times

Sometimes it doesn’t matter all that much if a movie is based on a true story or has sprung fully from the imagination of the screenwriter.

But in the case of Spike Lee’s searing, electric and sometimes flat-out funny “BlacKkKlansman,” knowing we’re seeing a dramatization of real-life events definitely helps — because if this were pure fiction, it would just seem too unbelievable. Given the red-hot raging hate rhetoric spewed by members of the Klan (and in some cases, their spouses), and their plans to commit a terrorist act against innocent civilians, “BlacKkKlansman” is filled with tense, gut-churning moments. We’d like to say it’s hard to believe certain people were so ignorant and so monstrous back in the 1970s — if there wasn’t so much evidence nothing has changed in the 2010s.

Washington and Driver are razor-sharp playing off one another. Topher Grace, as likable an actor as you’ll find, is brilliant playing a guy who is handsome and charming (in certain circles) but is an absolute garbage human being with no soul.

Lee keeps the multiple storylines humming at a brisk pace, while the soundtrack pops with great period-piece tunes such as “Ball of Confusion” by the Temptations and “Too Late to Turn Back Now” by the Cornelius Brothers and Sister Rose.

The film is bookended by two sequences that are not directly connected and yet are deeply bound to the main story. One segment is set decades ago; the other is raw and fresh, and we’ll leave it at that.

“BlacKkKlansman” is one of Spike Lee’s most accomplished films in recent memory, and one of the best films of 2018.

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